Check Your Tyres!

Car, Motorhome and Caravan Tyres fitted at My Garage Stourbridge, West Midlands

To book your vehicle in please contact Sharon or Grace on 01384 848 438 .

There are many reasons for Tyre wear, here are just 8 of them

  • Under Inflation - Under-inflation can cause the tyre to wear on the outer edges of the tread, leaving the central tread area far less worn. The tyre inner-liner can also degrade
  • Over Inflation - Over-inflation can result in the central tread area being forced into contact with the road causing rapid or crown wear
  • Mis Alignment - Can cause the edge of the tread to 'feather' and ware progressively from one side
  • Camber Wear - Excessive wheel camber can cause sloping wear on the outer edge of the tread on one shoulder of the tyre
  • Illegal Wear - This is when the tyre reaches the legal minimum pattern depth of 1.6mm across the central 3/4 of the tread, going around the complete circumference of the tyre
  • Emergency Braking - An emergency braking manoeuvre can cause the tyre to rapidly wear through the complete casing, causing the tyre to deflate
  • Cuts - Sharp objects can cause considerable damage rendering a tyre unserviceable
  • Impact Damager - Impact to the sidewall can cause a bulge or 'egg' indicating localised casing damage

How can I tell when my tyres need changing?

One sign that your tyres need changing is noticing a deterioration in performance. For example, your car does not handle or grip the road as well in poor weather conditions as it normally does, or it takes longer to stop when you apply the brakes.

The fact that tyres wear gradually can make it difficult to identify the reduction in performance, so it's best to have them checked regularly and preferably by an expert. It is the driver's responsibility to ensure that the tread on your tyres is not worn beyond the legal minimum limit of 1.6 millimetres.

To make this easier to identify, tyre manufacturers mould tread wear indicators (T.W.I) into the design of the tyres tread pattern usually at a tread level of 1.6mm. As soon as the tread is worn to the height of the tread wear indicator, the tyre has reached the legal minimum tread depth and you should replace the tyre as soon as possible.

You should also be aware that there are many different reasons for tyre wear. Your tyres don't just get worn through age and use, but through emergency braking, under-inflation or over-inflation. And if your wheels are misaligned, one edge of the tyre can wear more rapidly than the other edge.

We recommend a weekly walk around the car to check the tread, look for bulges or wear and to check tyre pressures everytime you fill the tank.

Putting your tyres to the test

Tyre tests are part of the fabric of the motor industry, whether it’s tyre manufacturers doing their own tests, or consumer groups, magazines and organisations like My Garage, Stourbridge putting tyres through their paces themselves.

There are plenty of tests out there – but with such a huge amount of information out there, it can be difficult to get to grips with tyre features and what to look for.

The truth is that whilst the best tyres have a lot in common and share a lot of the basic qualities, different tyres produce different responses on the road. So it’s important to choose the right one for you.

Let My Garage help you through the process and highlight some of the best manufacturers and tyres for specific circumstances.

Tyres show their mettle!

Braking

Ok so it sounds obvious but stopping your car as quickly and as safely as possible is critical. And depending on whether you’re driving on a dry road or in more hazardous conditions, the tyre you choose can affect how quickly your car can stop.
In wet conditions tyres like a Michelin Pilot Sport give consistently good performance. Stopping in the wet tests the compound of the tyre as well as the tread pattern – see “Aquaplaning”.
In dry conditions however it’s the tyre that can fit as much rubber on the ground as possible that wins the day. It’s all about grip. And when it comes to tyre grip a Pirelli Zero or Continental tyre are very high in contact.

Aquaplaning

Aquaplaning is the end result of a tyre losing grip on wet roads. Where normally a tyre’s tread would channel water away from where it has contact with the road, if it is very wet even the best tyres can lose the capacity to shift water away. When that happens the tyre ends up running on top of the water, effectively meaning the driver loses control.
Tyres that perform best under very wet conditions are those with directional tread patterns and side tread patterns. These effectively pump water as efficiently as possible away from the tyre’s contact with the ground. A good example is Goodyear’s HydraGrip tyres for being superb in the wet, particularly around corners.

Tyre noise

Quiet tyres mean a quiet drive and comfort is often as important to motorists as handling. So knowing which tyres are noisy and which are quiet can make a big difference.
By law your tyres have to meet certain noise level standards, and there are tests carried out to ensure this happens. But equally there are tyres that manage to muffle sound and produce a less noticeable noise than others.

Environmentally friendly

Rolling resistance of the tyre is key here. There are two elements to an environmentally-friendly tyre: how it affects fuel consumption, and the environmental impact of the manufacturing process itself.
Michelin claim to be ahead of the game, claiming its fuel-saving tyres have prevented 23 million tonnes of CO2 emissions since 1992. Their environmentally-friendly tyres use silica to try and reduce rolling resistance and therefore save fuel because the car needs less energy to roll on this type of rubber.
Whatever tyre you choose, you can save up to 8% on fuel by keeping the tyres at the correct pressure hence also reducing harmful emissions from your car.
So whatever the circumstances, different tyres produce different results. For most of us, of course, we have to make do with the same four wheels and the same tyres, whatever the situation. It’s therefore important to find a good all-round tyre that meets your needs

Ever wondered what the writing on your tyres means?

There are two main purposes of the writing that you'll see on the sidewall of your tyres.

  • The first is to help identify the size and specification of the tyres correctly.
  • The second is to confirm that the tyre has been tested and approved to European and other country safety standards. The European mandatory is known as 'E' marking.

Although not illegal, it is not recommended to have tyres with a lower speed rating or load capacity than the manufacturer recommended tyre specification for your vehicle, or to have a combination of different tyre construction types. Consult your vehicle handbook, which will confirm your vehicles tyre speed and load ratings as well as any additional requirements.

Load Index and Speed Ratings

The majority of tyres carry coded markings on them, which correspond to their load carrying and maximum speed capabilities.

For example: 92H

92 = Index of maximum load carrying capacity per tyre, in this case equates to 630kg.

H = Symbol which equates to a speed rating of 210km/h (approximately 131mph)

The load index is a numerical code, which corresponds to the maximum load a tyre can carry at the speed indicated by its speed symbol, under specific service conditions. For specific load index check the table below.

Load Index

Kilograms

Load Index

Kilograms

Load Index

Kilograms

65

290

80

450

95

690

66

300

81

462

96

710

67

307

82

475

97

730

68

315

83

487

98

750

69

325

84

500

99

775

70

335

85

515

100

800

71

345

86

530

101

825

72

355

87

545

102

850

73

365

88

560

103

875

74

375

89

580

104

900

75

387

90

600

105

925

76

400

91

615

106

950

77

412

92

630

107

975

78

425

93

650

108

1000

79

437

94

670

The speed symbol indicates the speed at which the tyre can carry the load corresponding with its load index. For specific speed rating check the table below

Speed Symbol

Approx MPH

Approx KM/H

Q

99

160

R

106

170

S

112

180

T

118

190

H

131

210

V

149

240

VR

131

210

W

168

270

Y

186

300

ZR

149

240

For more information regarding tyres please call Paddy or Pete on 01384 885006 or fill in the 'Make An Enquiry' form.